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Projects

We are dedicated to projects that align with our mission to acquire, preserve, and protect sacred lands, ranging from small-scale initiatives to large-scale endeavors. Our commitment extends to supporting conservation efforts that uphold our mission, ensuring the safeguarding of these invaluable natural spaces for generations to come.

The Sustainable Agricultural Lands Conservation Program (SALC) utilizes funding through California’s Cap-and-Trade system to protect critical agricultural lands that are at risk of conversion to more energy intensive uses.  Protecting these lands promotes smart growth within existing jurisdictions, ensures open space remains available, supports agricultural and tribal food systems, promotes biodiversity and soil health, and helps sequester climate change-causing emissions. The Native American Land Conservancy received funding through SALC’s Capacity and Project Development grant to expand organizational capacity to develop acquisition projects to acquire agricultural easement and fee acquisition projects throughout California. This program supports the ability of California Native Americans to engage in traditional and sustenance gathering, hunting, and fishing. 

 

 

The Native American Land Conservancy has been contacted by tribal communities interested in working with us to acquire lands for cultural protection and potential agricultural easements. Additional NALC is open and with this program has increased capacity for new partnerships to assist in protecting land. Our mission is to protect and restore sacred sites and areas. An example of some of our successful acquisitions and transfers include: 

 

  • Acquisition and management of the Old Woman Mountains Preserve 

  • Acquisition and management of Coyote Hole 

  • Lake Cahuilla Fish Traps Protection 

  • Horse Canyon transfer to the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park 

  • Mosler Property Transfer to the Kumeyaay people 

  • Acquisition at Hunat Paac Pihaaka’ (Bear’s Water) in Morongo Valley 

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